Revolt of the Plebs Broadcast Feb 19, 2013


Violent media programming creating the Breiviks and Adam Lanzas of the world–the ULTIMATE ‘conspiracy theory’ that very few are willing to embrace.

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  1. #1 by 1bigcree Shadowhawk on February 20, 2013 - 5:58 am

    That was a dynamite show Kieth. Would you please keep writing? The proper ending for ‘Inglorious BasTURDS’ indeed!! Heheh! You have a mind made of precious elements. A most profound gift. I mean that bro! What a gift! That’s all I can say. Am honored to know you.

  2. #2 by annebeck58 on February 20, 2013 - 8:18 am

    Thank you, Keith! It’s all I;ve been saying.

  3. #3 by persnipoles on February 20, 2013 - 8:33 am

    I don’t think Keith mentioned it specifically, but I wonder if it might be part of how two movies came up: the Dorner ‘manifesto’ happened to mention “Christopher Walz, you impressed me in Inglorious Basterds. After viewing Django Unchained, I was sold.” …I gather he went after family… Where’d he get that idea?

  4. #4 by Ingrid B on February 20, 2013 - 8:35 am

    What happened to the innocence of childhood? There was one other kid here in Norway, who expressed a desire to kill more people than Breivik, he got the necessary help.. seems kids, in America, are being pre-conditioned to become cannon fodder for the future.. Let`s face it, America is terminally ill..

    A few weeks ago, I sent a round e-mail to various regional TV stations here in Norway, in which I described the Norwegian FM as a Woody Allen lookalike. A couple of days ago, I caught a part of a show, not sure if it was here in Norway, or not, but a middle aged, bleached blonde, was wowing the audience by saying, “this country has an FM who is a Woody Allen lookalike, isn`t that hillarious”..

    Keith, you have a vivid imagination, and a good heart, such a pity that there are so many, who cannot see as clearly as you do..

  5. #5 by Tony on February 20, 2013 - 1:49 pm

    The video game. My oh my, what kids do for fun these days. When I was a kid, the most excitement we had was to look for discarded glass soda bottles and use them to buy candy. And if we were really ambitious, we would have “contests” to see how far we could pee.

  6. #6 by amerikagulag on February 20, 2013 - 5:47 pm

    Corraling the sheep into the desensitization pen. Feeding them a lust for violence. Making it seem ‘okay’. I saw this coming back in the 70’s with the advent of the realistic gore in movies. I no longer pander to Hollywood. I shut off the TeeVee over 15 years ago and haven’t missed anything. There is absolutely nothing the “stupid box” has that I need.

    But I also said “no” to my kids. They didn’t get the latest and greatest games, toys and distractions.That in itself is the key to usurping this stranglehold of mind control which the government has foisted on the unsuspecting public through the many and various ‘toys’ which Americans have been bought off with.

    Small wonder the soldiers of “the State” are so prone to suicide after returning home. It’s because they cant KILL any more! And that REALLY pisses them off.

  7. #7 by annebeck58 on February 20, 2013 - 8:04 pm

    “There is absolutely nothing the “stupid box” has that I need.”
    I do agree. It has been a long time since I watched the, “Idiot box”, as my dad called it.
    My son told me, last night, that FOX (of course) had put out some opposite-news, I guess lately. He was surprised, I guess, that they could say things that were absolutely opposed to truth.

    I told him it happens all the time and this is, in part, why so many people believe lies. The “newz” tells them it is not a lie.

  8. #8 by 1bigcree Shadowhawk on February 20, 2013 - 11:57 pm

    You comments bring back pleasant memories of my own childhood. Going fishing with my grandparents, catching frogs, grasshoppers, and other critters just for fun and spending long summer days into the evenings riding bikes, playing ball games with neighborhood boys. Jumping off my grandad’s garage into the tall grass and enjoying being a boy in general. Yeah such things are just not what most youngsters do anymore.

  9. #9 by Steven on February 21, 2013 - 3:25 am

    Blaming things like video games for criminal behavior instead of bad people is lame and irresponsible. Games are just an interesting diversion. It takes a immoral person to commit crimes and crimes are done by bad people and not by 1s and 0s in a computer or by some other inanimate object. Teach people some morals , manners , set a good example and quit sucking up to politically correct immoral minorities.

    ed note–contrary to earlier posts you have made here that have been well expressed and obviously well-thought out, this one is the exception.

    Like it or not, admit it or not, psychological conditioning is a major factor in programming people to do things. Why is America at war in the Middle East? Because of the psychological conditioning they received on 911 and afterwards. Why are Americans calling for a ban on ‘assault weapons?’–Because of the psychological conditioning they received in the aftermath of Aurora Colorado, Sandy Hook and others.

    On a more mundane level, why do we see young women running around with tattoos and young men with pierced body parts and their pants pulled half way down their asses? Did they all come up with these ideas on their own as individuals or were they socially/psychologically conditioned into making these choices through the use of media, images, role models and other criteria?

    In the several years that I taught school I saw first hand what video games did to kids and how it changed them, and this was many years ago before the games were as violent and as realistic as they are now. Add to this a society that has lost its moral bearings and you have a recipe for disaster.

    America was not always a killing field where young people went on rampages of mass murder. It is a recent phenomenon that not coincidentally runs in tandem with a society run by a media that glorifies violence against innocents and militarism.

  10. #10 by 1bigcree Shadowhawk on February 21, 2013 - 4:38 am

    Well said Mark G. For Steven; you might want to watch a YT video with an ex-KGB Agent named Juri Besmanov. It is an interview with the Author and historian G Edward Griffin, which was conducted back in the early 1990’s if I am not mistaken. Search it and watch: ‘Yuri Besmanov on How to Demoralize a Nation’.

  11. #11 by annebeck58 on February 21, 2013 - 5:17 am

    Steven, I don’t think anyone was or would blame videogames, alone, for the insanity of these mass-shootings, particularly by children and young adults. Much was said about how news-shows have contributed to this by pasting the killer’s faces all over the television, too. Did you miss the part where other countries have made it a crime to display the faces of kids who do these sorts of things, as well as those who commit suicide?

    I cannot, as a mother of two, say it’s only videogames. Of course, the parents are responsible for what games their kids play and how much time they should be allowed to play. When my mother-in-law purchased a few games I did not wish my son to have, I took them to the store and exchanged them for other items (not a videogame at all) and he never knew the difference. Same goes for these ultra-violent movies. If parents don’t allow the kids to watch these things, over and over again, kids would most likely be less violent. Desensitization to violence works to help create killers, and this is why our own military does the same sort of thing. I recall when we first went in via, “Shock and Awe”, into Afghanistan. The reporters were all talking about how this new breed of killers watched and played videogames (violent games and they named a few, to boot) to develop their hand-eye coordination. I don’t remember if they said anything about how it makes them “easier killers”, but I am sure it does.

    I do think, what we set our kids up doing as small children helps them to make decisions by the time they are in their teens or twenties, regarding what games they’d like to play, or if they are into videogames at all. And, almost anything a person does daily can become addictive over time. My dad used to say that if you do something every day for thirty days, you will do it the rest of your life. Of course, he was trying to get me to make my bed, at the time– so I’d do it for thirty days and stop, just to prove him wrong.

    Regardless, if society seems to accept violence through entertainment, society should not be so surprised when kids will copy what they’ve seen. Add to this the varied and assorted prescription medications too many kids are given to keep them under control in school, and you do have a recipe for violent disaster.

  12. #13 by loukil020 on February 24, 2013 - 1:15 am

    good show

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